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Here is what we are working on now.... Coming soon another learning tool using, a pictorial and video documentary of the Arizona Rivers.

Arizona’s Major Rivers              Dams                           Canals, Lakes, & Reservoirs 

Colorado River                      Morelos Dam                     Mexico Diversion Canal

                                Laguna Dam                      Laguna Dam Reservoir

                                                Imperial Dam                     Imperial Dam Reservoir

                                                Palo Verde Dam                Irrigation Diversion

                                                Headgate Rock Dam          Canal Diversion

                                                Parker Dam                       Lake Havasu

                                                Davis Dam                         Lake Mohave

                                                Hoover Dam                      Lake Mead

                                                Glen Canyon Dam              Lake Powell

  

Gila River                               Painted Rock Dam            Painted Rock Reservoir

                                                Gillespie Dam (Breached)  Gillespie Dam Reservoir
                                Coolidge Dam                   San Carlos Lake
Gila River Tributaries

1) Hassayampa River

2/ Agua Fria River                    New Waddell Dam            Lake Pleasant

3) Salt River                             Portable Rubber Dam        Tempe Town Lake

    Salt River - Verde River       Bartlett Dam                       Bartlett Lake

                                               Horseshoe Dam                  Horseshoe Lake

    Salt River                            Granite Reef Dam               Granite Reef Reservoir

                                               Stewart Mountain Dam       Saguaro Lake

                                               Mormon Flat Dam              Canyon Lake

                                               Horse Mesa Dam                Apache Lake

                                               Theodore Roosevelt Dam    Theodore Roosevelt Lake

4) Santa Cruz River

5) San Pedro River

6) San Carlos River

7) San Simon River

8) San Francisco River

All rights reserved. Reproduction of this product, in part or in whole, is strictly prohibited. Pow Wow Sales, P. O. Box 11341, Casa Grande, AZ 85130 (520) 560-0271

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AZRivers/MorelosDam001.jpg

The Morelos Diversion Dam is the first dam going up the Colorado River. There are fifteen major dams going up the Colorado River from the mouth of the Colorado River near San Luis, Arizona and Mexico to the Rockies in Colorado. The Morelos Diversion Dam was built in 1950 and is the ninth dam built on the Colorado River to its headwaters in the Rocky Mountains. With so much water being diverted from the Colorado River it is presently dry south of County 15th Street near Somerton, Arizona.

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The Morelos Diversion Dam diverts most of the Colorado River into irrigation canals in Mexico. What little water passes the dam today goes into more irrigation canals in Arizona and the rest only flows to about County 15th Street where the Colorado River becomes a dry river bed.

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We are looking at the spillway of the Morelos Diversion Dam.

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We are looking at the Morelos Dam diversion locks going into the Mexico canal system.

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The Laguna Dam is the first dam built on the Colorado River. It took two years to build the dam from 1902 to 1905 and was operational in 1906.

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The locks of the Laguna Dam.

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The Colorado River entering the locks of the Laguna Dam.

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We are looking at the spillway of the Laguna Dam.

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The Imperial Dam was built in 1938 and it is the fifth dam built on the Colorado River. It is 3,475 feet wide across the Colorado River. There are three sections of locks diverting water into disilting processes before going into canals for the Imperial Valley. Imperial Valley is the worlds largest source of produce.

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Construction on the Imerial Dam was started in 1936 and was completed in 1938.

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The Palo Verde Diversion Dam was built in 1958 and it is the twelfth dam built on the Colorado River.

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The Colorado River's normal water flow over the Palo Verde Diversion Dam and down the Colorado River.

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Boaters on the Colorado River south of the Palo Verde Diversion Dam.

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We are looking at the Palo Verde Diversion Dam where the water from the Colorado River is being diverted from the diversion locks into the irrigation canal.

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The Parker Dam was the sixth dam built on the Colorado River. The dam became operational in 1938 and forms Lake Havasu.

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The Parker Dam was built in 1838 and forms Lake Havasu.

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The Parker Dam was built in 1938 and forms Lake Havasu.

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The Parker Dam was built in 1938 and forms Lake Havasu. We are looking at the dams spillway.

                              The Gila River

From the Gila River Confluence with the Colorado River in Yuma Arizona to the Route 92 Bridge over the Gila River in New Mexico, there are three storage dams forming three lakes, four diversion dams and eight major tributaries. The three dams are the Painted Rock Dam, the Gillespie Dam and the Coolidge Dam. Going up the Gila River the first tributary is the Hassayampa River, then the Agua Fria River, the Salt River, the Santa Curz River, the San Pedro River, the San Carlos River, the San Simon River and the San Francisco River.

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The confluence of the Gila River with the Colorado River looking up the Colorado River.

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Looking down the Colorado River from the confluence of the Gila River.

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From the mouth of the Gila River with the Colorado River to the Arizona Boarders of New Mexico the Gila River has three dams, four diversion dams and eight major tributaries. The first dam and reservoir is at Painted Rock. Presently both the dam and reservoir are closed to the public.

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The Painted Rock Petroglyph Site is only a few miles from the Painted Rock Dam and Reservoir.

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The Painted Rock Dam is the third dam built on the Gila River and became operational in 1960. The dam and reservoir are presently closed to the public.

 

 

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AZRivers/GillespieDam001.jpg

Entrance to the Gillespie Dam Bridge traveling south on Old US 80 Hwy. 

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The northwest side of the Gillespie Dam Bridge.

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Looking at the Gillispie Dam breach from the Gillespie Dam Bridge. The Gillespie Dam was the first dam built on the Gila River. The dam became operational in 1921 and was breached in 1993.

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Looking up the Gila River from the Gillespie Dam Bridge. The Gillespie Dam was breached in 1993.

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Looking down the Gila River from the Gillespie Dam Bridge.

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Southeast side of the Gillespie Dam Bridge.

AZRivers/HassayampaRiver001.jpg

Looking down the Hassayampa River from the Old US 80 Hwy Hassayampa River Bridge in May 2013. The Hassayampa River is a perennial river flowing year round. In some places it goes underground and then reappears down stream. The confluence is about two miles south of the bridge on private property.

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Looking up the Hassayampa River from the Old US 80 Hwy Hassayampa Bridge in February 2014. Gold was first discovered in Arizona by miners going up the Hassayampa River in what was then the New Mexico Territory from the Gadsen Purchase of 1853.

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Water flowing down the Hassayampa River in May 2013.

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Looking down the Hassayampa River from the Old US 80 Hwy Bridge in February 2014.

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Agua Fria River Confluence with the Gila River.

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The confluence of the Salt River with the Gila River. View from the Avondale Bridge looking up stream.

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The Santa Cruz Mission is yards away from the Santa Cruz River and about a mile and a half away from the confluence of the Santa Cruz River with the Gila River.

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Looking up the Santa Cruz River next to the Santa Cruz Mission.

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Looking down the Santa Cruz River going under the Santa Cruz Bridge about a mile away from the confluence with the Gila River.

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The bank of the Santa Cruz River is next to the Santa Cruz Mission.

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The Kelvin Bridge over the Gila River.

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The Kelvin Bridge was built in 1916 by the Topeka Bridge & Iron Co.

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Looking up the Gila River from the Kelvin Bridge.

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Looking down the Gila River from the Kelvin Bridge.

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The privately owned Kearny Bridge over the Gila River.

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Looking up the Gila River from the privately owned Kearny Bridge.

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Looking down the Gila River from the privately owned Kearny Bridge.

AZRivers/OldWinkelmanBridge001.jpg

The old washed out Winkelman Bridge went over the Gila River and the confluence of the San Pedro River. The confluence keeps moving from monsoon season to monsoon season. Presently it is west of the railroad bridge about one hundred yards.

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The Coolidge Dam is the second dam built on the Gila River and became operational in 1930. The Coolidge Dam forms the San Carlos Lake.

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Route 70 bridge crossing the San Simon River traveling west.

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Route 70 bridge crossing the San Simon River traveling east.

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Looking up the San Simon River from the Route 70 bridge.

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Looking down the San Simon River from the Route 70 bridge. The San Simon River confluence with the Gila River is about two miles north of the Route 70 bridge. It is on private farming property and dirt trails go about a mile and a half along the banks of the San Simon River.

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The Route 191 Bridge and the Railroad Bridge crossing the San Fancisco River at Clifton, AZ.

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The first know Amercians going down the San Francisco River in 1825 were beaver trappers.

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Looking up the San Francisco River from the Route 191 bridge.

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The San Francisco River flowing under the bridges entering Clifton, AZ.

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Looking down the San Francisco River from the Route 191 bridge.

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New Mexico Route 92 Bridge crossing over the Gila River about three miles from Route 70.

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Looking up the Gila River from the New Mexico Route 92 Bridge.

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Looking down the Gila River from the New Mexico Route 92 Bridge.